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  #1  
Old 02-08-18, 12:13 PM
Timcote1960 Timcote1960 is offline
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Fly my 337G?

Hi all,

Before Feb 22, 2018, I need to reposition my 337 N639GC from Gaithersburg MD KGAI to Manchester NH KMHT so I can do my training and checkride for multiengine rating. I do have a C182 and an instrument rating that I can use for this adventure.

My insurance company requires any other pilot to have 25hrs of 337 time. I thought it might be more fun to look for someone on here than to pay the CFII to help reposition her. If you’re game, I can collect you in my C182 from your airport, fly you to Gaithersburg for you to get my 337, we fly up to Manchester NH, then I fly you home in the 182 and get myself home too.

If you’re interested in such fun, call Tim at 202 738 6336. If I do get any takers will pay for the ferry next week.
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  #2  
Old 02-12-18, 08:08 PM
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Jerry De Santis Jerry De Santis is offline
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Multi rating.

Are you aware that getting your rating in a Skymaster is an inline thrust rating only. That is, while you log your flight time as multi engine, the FAA does not consider that time as multi engine experience. However, if you get you rating in a multi engine (engines on wings) plane, you count it as multi engine. It is a quirk in the regs. Example, say in several years you log 400 hours in the Skymaster with an inline rating, if you wanted to purchase a conventional multi engine plane, The FAA will not recognize your time as multi engine time. However, if you have conv. Multi engine rating, all the time in the Skymaster will be considered multi engine experience. I know, it is nuts, but that's the way it is. I suggest you consider training in a conventional twin.

Good Luck
Jerry
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  #3  
Old 02-13-18, 10:59 AM
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hharney hharney is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jerry De Santis View Post
I suggest you consider training in a conventional twin.
I agree with Jerry, I think this is really important for the future of flight

BTW, did you find anyone to fly your plane for you? Why would you not hire the CFI to fly with you so that you can log some time? I can do the ferry flight for you if you need someone but would have to airline in and out.
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  #4  
Old 02-13-18, 12:07 PM
Timcote1960 Timcote1960 is offline
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I THOUGHT this was the right place...

Well, clearly this was not the right place to seek out friends to actually fly....

To reposition my plane as I offered would, I thought, have been fun, saved me a grand in flying a CFII around and made a new friend. Instead, I get comments from people who want to upend my training program. Let me be clear: I am 58 and this is my last plane. I expect to fly it for 20 years or so then leave aviation when I no longer can do it. I have no commercial aspirations. I've flown a 182 for about 500hrs over the past 3 years since I started flying. I like a centerline thrust, I only want a centerline thrust. The FAA created the centerline thrust certificate for a reason. I am that reason.

Two months ago I lost my two CFIIs, both 4000+ pilots and one of them the head of the damn NTSB. They went down in an Indiana field at night in their C210 when at 8000' it threw a rod. The nearest open airport was 27mi away, the nearest (but closed) airport was 3mi but was unlit. Along with one daughter and two dog, they crashed and burned. Only one dog survived. I had been having arguments with them about my plan to buy the 337 and they insisted single engine flight is safe and two engines useless. They warned me of the extra demands of averse yaw, but hatted the 337 (as many do, you know). Hell of a way for me to win an argument.

Anyways, I was not looking for all this wise commentary on why I ought to train in a conventional twin. Thank you very much for all the unsolicited advice. I was looking for someone to fly my 337 with me. I guess I will just rent a driver.

Doubtful I sought the right venue here. Or maybe not. Any takers?

Tim
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  #5  
Old 02-16-18, 11:23 AM
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Jerry De Santis Jerry De Santis is offline
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Flying

Tim, no one is trying to upend your training program, we can't read your mind! My suggestion was not only intended for you but also others that will read the posting. I wish you well in your training and I hope you fly trouble free in your Skymaster. As a point of interest however, I have more than 3200 hours in Skymasters and Herb even more time than me. As you fly your plane I am sure you will come across things that you would like to learn regarding the Skymaster. Hope at that time you will keep an open mind on the various posting you will receive. They are all intended to help not hinder you.

I wish you well and safe flying!
Jerry
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  #6  
Old 02-16-18, 12:45 PM
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LostKiwi LostKiwi is offline
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If you don't need it moved right quick, I might be able to throw my hat in the ring.

I'm overseas for the next 4 weeks, but have time off march/april.
Fire me a PM for contact details and maybe we can work something out.



Sorry about the late reply.

Leighton.
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  #7  
Old 02-17-18, 12:14 PM
cessnadriver cessnadriver is offline
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Cool Fly my 337G?

Way to go Tim!!!!!!!!!!!!
I too am in that frame of mind! I bought a 1965 Skymaster and got some of the same options about "You ought to get a conventional twin rating-BS" As I told others the Skymaster is the only twin I'd fly, MAINLY because I'm scared to death of the dead engine in a conventional twin. I'm starting my CLT training in the spring after buying my Skymaster last August-had to do an annual which had several problems that took many weeks per problem and winter set in before starting my training. I was somewhat lucky in finding a MEI, with Skymaster time, just 50 miles away-but- he's VERY busy with his air chart service so I tried to get a local Skymaster pilot to relocate my plane the fifty miles. That's when I found one of the BIG problems with my bird. While running up before take-off the front engine was running rough well above the max RPM drop. So couple more weeks to repair that problem, spark plugs and leads. GOOD LUCK WITH YOUR TRAINING and welcome to the "Skymaster World"! If you have other questions don't hesitate to post here, generally the guys/gals on this site are nice.
Regards, BILLS

Last edited by cessnadriver : 02-17-18 at 12:18 PM. Reason: grammar
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  #8  
Old 02-18-18, 01:32 AM
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Red Air Rambo Red Air Rambo is offline
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Sounds like Fun! Wish my calendar was free. I have some friends up there I would love to catch up with.

Regards,
Brent
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  #9  
Old 03-08-18, 08:01 AM
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SkyMac SkyMac is offline
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Hi Tim

Just thought I would follow up to see how the relocation progressed. Enjoy the training for the CLT, I too decided this option was right for me as private VFR.

Dave
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  #10  
Old 03-14-18, 06:52 PM
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rhurt rhurt is offline
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I was unaware

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jerry De Santis View Post
Are you aware that getting your rating in a Skymaster is an inline thrust rating only. That is, while you log your flight time as multi engine, the FAA does not consider that time as multi engine experience. However, if you get you rating in a multi engine (engines on wings) plane, you count it as multi engine. It is a quirk in the regs. Example, say in several years you log 400 hours in the Skymaster with an inline rating, if you wanted to purchase a conventional multi engine plane, The FAA will not recognize your time as multi engine time. However, if you have conv. Multi engine rating, all the time in the Skymaster will be considered multi engine experience. I know, it is nuts, but that's the way it is. I suggest you consider training in a conventional twin.

Good Luck
Jerry
I was not aware of this quirk in the FAA regulations. Can you point me toward the FAR for reference? I need to advise my students.

Thanks!
Randy
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  #11  
Old 03-15-18, 02:20 PM
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JimC JimC is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jerry De Santis View Post
Example, say in several years you log 400 hours in the Skymaster with an inline rating, if you wanted to purchase a conventional multi engine plane, The FAA will not recognize your time as multi engine time.
I do not believe that this is correct. Your 337 time counts as mutiengine time for the purposes of FAR 61.129(b). I think that's the only place the FAA refers to logging multi time. The rest is between you and your insurance company, or the company that interviews you for your next position.
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  #12  
Old 03-16-18, 01:54 PM
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rhurt rhurt is offline
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I agree. I bet all the fighter pilot guys who got centerline thrust ratings in F111s, F-15s, etc, agree too.
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  #13  
Old 03-17-18, 05:49 PM
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hharney hharney is offline
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There is still a "Center Line Thrust Limitation" for inline twin engine, Skymaster. When you take the required check ride for multi engine you must demonstrate Vmc. There is no Vmc on a Skymaster therefore the "CLT Limitation" If you have the limitation you cannot log standard multi engine as you are limited to only CLT.

It's been around for years and years guys
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  #14  
Old 03-17-18, 06:20 PM
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JimC JimC is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hharney View Post
There is still a "Center Line Thrust Limitation" for inline twin engine, Skymaster....It's been around for years and years guys
Of course. But 337 hours are multi hours in the FAA's eyes. It doesn't matter if you are AMEL, CLT or AMEL, unrestricted.
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  #15  
Old 03-17-18, 11:00 PM
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hharney hharney is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JimC View Post
Of course. But 337 hours are multi hours in the FAA's eyes. It doesn't matter if you are AMEL, CLT or AMEL, unrestricted.
That is correct as long as you don't have the limitation.......but the insurance suits are going to be the police and they ain't gonna let some pilot with limited on their tag drive a twin Comanche
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